Home RecipesIndianCurry Kamal kakdi with Amritsari wadi (Lotus stem curry)

Kamal kakdi with Amritsari wadi (Lotus stem curry)

by Rachna

IMG_0065

Lotus stem or kamal kakdi is a favorite of mine for its crunchy texture and taste that can take on any flavors. I have enjoyed it in mixed pickles. But I wanted to make a good curry out of it. The recipe I am sharing with you is my own brainwave. I teamed it with the very spicy Amritsari wadi that my husband had brought from his trip there. Those are quite spicy and hot and I felt would balance the blandness of lotus stem perfectly. And, I was very happy when the curry turned out tasty so much so that even my younger son loved it. Of course, he ate it without the wadis (too spicy for him).

So let me share this easy to rustle up dish

Recipe

Preparation time: Chopping the lotus stem 10 minutes

Cooking time: 30 minutes including frying of wadis

Serves: 4

Ingredients:

Lotus stem: 250 gms. cleaned and cut into thin rounds

2 large Amritsari wadis (Go easy on them because they are fiery spicy)

1 large tablespoon ginger-garlic paste

1 tsp. cumin seeds

1/2 cup tomato puree

1 pinch turmeric

1/2 tsp. garam masala powder

salt to taste

Oil for frying + 2 tsp. oil for the gravy

Method: Cook the chopped lotus stem with 1/2 tsp. salt and 2 cups water in a pressure cooker for 1 whistle. Let it cool down on its own. Meanwhile, in a kadhai or wok, heat up some oil. Break up the wadis into smaller pieces. I shallow fry the wadis till they are nice and crispy. You can deep fry as well. Keep aside.

In a pan, take two tsp. oil and heat it. Add 1 tsp. cumin seeds and wait for them to sputter. Now add ginger-garlic paste and cook it for a couple of minutes. If it becomes too dry, add a little water and roast it till the raw smell goes. Now tip in the tomato puree and cook some more. Add turmeric and garam masala powder and add the cooked lotus stem along with the water they were cooked in. Simmer for 5-10 minutes. Taste and adjust seasoning especially salt. Toward the end, tip in the fried wadis and cook for a couple of minutes more. Taste again and check seasoning.

You can finish with some finely chopped coriander leaves. The thin gravy is simple yet tasty. Goes well with chapatis and rice. Enjoy!

Facebook Comments
26 comments

You may also like

26 comments

Sandhya Kumar June 7, 2013 - 11:55 am

I have tasted readymade kamal kakdi ka ‘fryam’ type rings. We fry them and eat like paapads. The readymade ones are with salt and spices. I have never seen a raw kamal ka kakdi. Let me check if it is available here in some market. Would love to try it.

I haven’t heard about Amritsari wadi also. Are they the brown things in the curry? How do they make it? Let me check if it is available here. The recipe sounds good. Thank you, Rachna!

Reply
Rachna June 7, 2013 - 5:52 pm

I get them easily at Hypercity in Bangalore. The raw ones are long and brown cylinders. They need to be peeled and diced. Amritsari wadi is available at your local Marwari kirana store. Ask them for it. They are normally supplied by home cooks. You can make them too but it is a tedious process. The recipe is really simple. Hopefully you will like it if you get the ingredients.

Reply
Sandhya Kumar June 7, 2013 - 11:55 am

I have tasted readymade kamal kakdi ka ‘fryam’ type rings. We fry them and eat like paapads. The readymade ones are with salt and spices. I have never seen a raw kamal ka kakdi. Let me check if it is available here in some market. Would love to try it.

I haven’t heard about Amritsari wadi also. Are they the brown things in the curry? How do they make it? Let me check if it is available here. The recipe sounds good. Thank you, Rachna!

Reply
Rachna June 7, 2013 - 5:52 pm

I get them easily at Hypercity in Bangalore. The raw ones are long and brown cylinders. They need to be peeled and diced. Amritsari wadi is available at your local Marwari kirana store. Ask them for it. They are normally supplied by home cooks. You can make them too but it is a tedious process. The recipe is really simple. Hopefully you will like it if you get the ingredients.

Reply
Jas June 7, 2013 - 12:06 pm

I need to check if I can get kamal kakadi here.. have never seen it in the market but really a good idea to balance out the spice of Amritsari wadis… they are fiery hot.

Reply
Rachna June 7, 2013 - 5:53 pm

Yep, the wadis are hot as hell but so yummy too :).

Reply
Jas June 7, 2013 - 12:06 pm

I need to check if I can get kamal kakadi here.. have never seen it in the market but really a good idea to balance out the spice of Amritsari wadis… they are fiery hot.

Reply
Rachna June 7, 2013 - 5:53 pm

Yep, the wadis are hot as hell but so yummy too :).

Reply
nabanita21 June 7, 2013 - 12:26 pm

nicee… looks tasty and I’m feeling hungry after seeing it; more so as due to a troubling stomach I’ve not had anything since morning ! 🙂

Reply
Rachna June 7, 2013 - 5:53 pm

I know food pictures make you feed even more hungry :).

Reply
nabanita21 June 7, 2013 - 12:26 pm

nicee… looks tasty and I’m feeling hungry after seeing it; more so as due to a troubling stomach I’ve not had anything since morning ! 🙂

Reply
Rachna June 7, 2013 - 5:53 pm

I know food pictures make you feed even more hungry :).

Reply
Aruna Panangipally June 7, 2013 - 3:22 pm

I love this dish… I first had it at the home of a Sindhi Family friend. Some Sindhi-Punjabi restaurants in Mumbai do serve a mean “Bhee ki Sabzi” as Kamal Kakdi ki Sabzi is also know. 🙂

Reply
Rachna June 7, 2013 - 5:54 pm

Welcome to the blog, Aruna. Yes, bhein as it is called in Punjabi is used commonly in Punjabi and Kashmiri cuisines. And wadis are yummy and crunchy though they are very spicy.

Reply
Aruna Panangipally June 7, 2013 - 6:38 pm

I must try the wadis soon… As an die-hard Andhra, the word “spicy” is music to my ears… 🙂

Reply
Rachna June 7, 2013 - 8:44 pm

You are going to love it then :).

Reply
Aruna Panangipally June 7, 2013 - 3:22 pm

I love this dish… I first had it at the home of a Sindhi Family friend. Some Sindhi-Punjabi restaurants in Mumbai do serve a mean “Bhee ki Sabzi” as Kamal Kakdi ki Sabzi is also know. 🙂

Reply
Rachna June 7, 2013 - 5:54 pm

Welcome to the blog, Aruna. Yes, bhein as it is called in Punjabi is used commonly in Punjabi and Kashmiri cuisines. And wadis are yummy and crunchy though they are very spicy.

Reply
Aruna Panangipally June 7, 2013 - 6:38 pm

I must try the wadis soon… As an die-hard Andhra, the word “spicy” is music to my ears… 🙂

Reply
Rachna June 7, 2013 - 8:44 pm

You are going to love it then :).

Reply
Sandhya Kumar June 7, 2013 - 8:49 pm

I have to get the ingredients when I visit Bangalore.

Reply
Sandhya Kumar June 7, 2013 - 8:49 pm

I have to get the ingredients when I visit Bangalore.

Reply
B K chowla June 8, 2013 - 11:01 am

I can never comment on any cooking blog.But, I am very fond of Lotus Stem in any form

Reply
Rachna June 8, 2013 - 12:16 pm

Me too, love it. Am trying out various recipes with it. And Thank you for making the exception for my blog.

Reply
B K chowla June 8, 2013 - 11:01 am

I can never comment on any cooking blog.But, I am very fond of Lotus Stem in any form

Reply
Rachna June 8, 2013 - 12:16 pm

Me too, love it. Am trying out various recipes with it. And Thank you for making the exception for my blog.

Reply

Leave a Comment